Graduate Master Course List

Courses, NJIT

HIST 620. City and Disease in History. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Explores the dynamic interaction between the growth of cities and changes in the experience and location of disease. Presumes the intertwining of these two historical developments in the birth of a distinctly urban identity, one predicated on the notion that the modern city is somehow inherently diseased. Focuses on the New York and Newark metropolitan areas in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among the topics considered are epidemic outbreaks, quarantines, the technology and organization of sanitation and hygiene, the professional formation of public, industrial and occupational medicine, and medical and popular responses to immigration.

HIST 622. Culture and Science in the History of American Medicine. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Provides an overview of American medical history and a familiarity with the theoretical and practical ramifications of different approaches to the complex relationships between medicine, science, and culture. Topics include: the extent to which medicine is or has been scientific; reasons why science has been considered so important to medicine's professional culture; and the degree to which medicine's professional culture has been shaped by science as well as other factors, such as economic and political self-interest, technology, class, race, gender, and other kinds of cultural values.

HIST 624. Technology, Environment and Medicine in World History, 1500-1900. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Examines the interrelationship between the emerging modern world system and changes in technology, environment, and medicine, with particular emphasis on European overseas expansion and its impact in non-Western regions.

HIST 626. Social History of American Medicine Since 1800. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Topics include the practices of 19th-century regular medicine; the relation between medical concepts and mainstream social thought; the treatment of women's health; antebellum alternative healers and alternative politics; the triumphs of late 19th- and early 20th-century medical therapeutics; the emergence of medicine as big business; medicine and racism; the emergence of nursing as a profession; modern medicine in an international perspective; New Age healing; the AIDS crisis and AIDS activism; and contemporary debates on the future of health care in the United States.

HIST 628. Gender, Science and Technology in the Modern World. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Introduction to a wide range of political and cultural analyses of science and technology, with an emphasis on recent feminist critiques of science. Explores the questions of scientific neutrality; the gendering of scientific knowledge; the relationship between science, technology, and capitalism; the role of science in international politics; and why science has not freed women.

HIST 630. History of the Body in Modern Western Culture. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Considers medical or scientific history primarily in terms of implications for bodily experience in everyday life. Begins with grand narratives of historical shifts in bodily perceptions and practices, and proceeds to more focused narratives of changing bodily experience, engaging key distinctions between genders, classes, and species as well as perceptions of pain and internal bodily structure. Materials will be drawn from early modern and modern Europe, as well as more recent bodily experience in the United States.

HIST 632. Technology, Culture and History. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Treats the relationship between technology and cultural values in a variety of historical and geographical settings, from early modern Japan to twentieth-century America. Examines the ways in which cultural ideals, conceptions, and preconceptions serve to influence the rate and manner of technological change, as well as the ways in which technology affects social and cultural life.

HIST 634. Environmental History of North America. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Explores the dialog between humankind and the environment in North America over the course of the last four centuries. Examines the latest and most interesting work done in the new field of environmental history to see what such a perspective has to offer.

HIST 635. History of Technology, Environment and Medicine: Theory and Method. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

A team-taught course which surveys the methods employed in the three fields. Explores the interdisciplinary nature of each field, and the value of interdisciplinary scholarship.

HIST 637. Global Environmental History. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

This course takes a global view of human interaction with the natural world, mixing broad themes such as colonialism and industrialization with detailed case studies in an effort ot understand the ways that people and the environment have mutually shaped one another. Because environmental change often transcends national boundaries, this course places important subjects in environmental history such as disease, agriculture, pollution, and environmentalism into a global and transnational context.

HIST 638. Social History of Communication. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Treats selected themes in the history of communication in different social and cultural contexts, from the ancient world to the twentieth century. Topics include: orality, proto-literacy, and literacy in ancient and medieval cultures; printing and the development of print culture in the early modern world; the "communication revolution" of the late 19th and early 20th centuries; and historiographical debates over the role of communication technologies in society.

HIST 640. The Urban Environment. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Examines the role of the economy, culture, and technology in shaping the urban environment. Makes extensive use of Newark and the New York metropolitan area, including field observations and local research. In addition to other topics, explores in detail spatial relationships, the role of transportation, and the development of suburbia.

HIST 642. The History of Health and International Development. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

This course examines the history of western efforts to promote health and nutrition in the "developing world" from the beginnings of tropical medicine. We will trace this history through its many permutations from the establishment of colonial health services to the development of the Global Programme on AIDS. In doing so, we will explore the various economic and political interests and underlying cultural assumptions that have shaped the development of ideas and practices associated with international health and development.

HIST 644. War, Technology and Society, 1500-1914. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Examines key themes in the interrelationship between warfare, technology and society from the beginnings of modern warfare until World War I. Primary emphasis placed on the historical connections between violent conflict, the technical means by which it is carried out, and the socio-political environment within which wars take place. The effect of technology upon war and considerations of the effect of war on technological change and development. Samples the rich tradition of thought and ideas produced by philosophers and theorists on these themes.

HIST 645. American Legal History to 1860. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Readings and discussion on the legacy of common law after the Revolution; the emergence of legal instrumentalism; and the evolution of tort, contract, and damages in the context of industrialism and economic growth.

HIST 650. History of American Conservatism. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

This course examines postwar American conservatism through classic works and contemporary studies. Topics include the rise of conservatism, groups under the conservative umbrella, and the rise of the right as related to key events in postwar history (Cold War, McCarthysim, the '60s, the suburbs and urban change). Course interrogates postwar conservatism with respect to American political and intellectual history and in relation to histories of gender, race, class, sexuality, place and religion.

HIST 652. Topics in the History of Technology. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Selected topics in the history of technology.

HIST 653. Topics in European Intellectual and Cultural History. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Examination of issues and methods in European intellectual and cultural history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.

HIST 654. Topics in American Intellectual and Cultural History. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Examination of issues and methods in American intellectual and cultural history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.

HIST 655. Topics in American Urban and Ethnic History. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Examination of issues and methods in American urban and ethnic history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.

HIST 656. Topics in the History of Health. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Selected topics in the history of Health.

HIST 657. Topics in Environmental History. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Selected topics in environmental history.

HIST 658. Topics in American Legal History. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Readings and discussion on the growth of legal formalism, the evolution of substantive due process, changes in legal education and the legal profession, and the evolution of private law.

HIST 660. The Enlightenment in Britain. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

The 18th century was the age of the Enlightenment. Great Britain became a unified polity and the most powerful imperial force in the world. We examine the Enlightenment in Britain against the backdrop of war and empire, imperial consumer culture, the growth and significance of sociability and politeness, representations of gender, the writing of cultural history, social uses of science/technology, print culture, and competition among varying notions of ethnic identity.

HIST 661. Problems and Readings in European History since 1850. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in European history since 1850.

HIST 662. Problems and Readings in the History of U. S.  Foreign Policy and Diplomacy. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Examination of issues and methods in American diplomatic history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.

HIST 663. Problems and Readings in American History, 1492-1789. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history from 1492 to 1789.

HIST 664. Problems and Readings in American History, 1789-1865. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history from 1789 to 1865.

HIST 665. Problems and Readings in American History, 1865-1914. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history from 1865 to 1914.

HIST 666. Problems and Readings in American History, 1890-1945. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history from 1890 to 1945.

HIST 667. Problems and Readings in American History, 1945-Present. 3 credits, 3 contact hours. Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history since 1945.

HIST 701. Master's Thesis. 0 credits, 0 contact hours.

Prerequisite: permission of graduate history advisor. For students writing a master's thesis in the history of technology, environment and medicine.

HIST 701B. Master's Thesis. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Restriction: permission of graduate history advisor. For students writing a master's thesis in the history of technology, environment and medicine.

HIST 701C. Master's Thesis. 6 credits, 6 contact hours. Restriction: permission of graduate history advisor. For students writing a master's thesis in the history of technology, environment and medicine.

HIST 702. Master's Essay. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

For those who don't write a 6 credit thesis, the 3 credit Master's Essay caps the M.A./M.A.T. A substantial work done with an advisor, may be:

  1. Interpretive historical essay based on primary source research.
  2. Narrative history based on primary source research. Prereq: R510:504, R510:505, or R510:506.
  3. Historiographical essay.
  4. Content-focused curriculum design, either a course or significant portion thereof.
  5. Design for an historical museum exhibition/other work in public history. Prereq: R510:565.

HIST 725. Independent Study. 3 credits, 1 contact hour.

Restriction: permission of graduate history advisor and course instructor.

HIST 726. Independent Study. 3 credits, 1 contact hour. Restriction: permission of graduate history advisor and course instructor.

HIST 727. Independent Study. 3 credits, 3 contact hours.

Restriction: permission of graduate history advisor and course instructor.

HIST 791. Seminar in History of Technology, Environment and Medicine. 0 credits, 0 contact hours.

Faculty, students and invited speakers present and discuss current topics of research in history, technology and medicine.

 

Courses, Rutgers-Newark

510 is the Subject Code for Graduate History Courses

26:510:504. READING AND WRITING NARRATIVE HISTORY (3)

Critical reading and writing of narrative history, one of history’s oldest literary forms.

26:510:505. HISTORY IN FICTION AND FACT (3)

Juxtaposes closely related works of history, biography, memoir, and fiction in order to explore the past, the nature of historical understanding, and the possibilities of creative historical writing.

26:510:506. THE POETICS OF HISTORY (3)

Exploration of one or more of the literary forms that history has taken since Herodotus. Those forms include (but are not limited to) epic, chronicle, drama, narrative, interpretive essays, monographs, statistical studies, and social scientific reports.

26:510:514. US DIPLOMATIC HISTORY (3)

Selected topics in United States diplomatic history.

26:510:515. TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF GENDER (3)

Selected topics in the history of gender.

26:510:516. THE WEST, ISLAM, AND THE MIDDLE EAST (3)

Examination of the historical relationship between Europe/the West and the Islamic world of the Middle East and surrounding regions from the advent of Islam in the seventh century to today.

26:510:517. CAPITALISM AND SOCIALISM (3)

The history of Western economic systems and ideologies from the origins of capitalism in early-modern Europe through the rise of socialism in the nineteenth century and social democracy in the twentieth century. Topics include the agricultural and industrial revolutions; liberal ideologies and policies of the nineteenth century; Marxism and socialist thought; the Soviet model; the Great Depression; growth of the welfare state after World War II; and the problem of underdevelopment.

26:510:520. TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY (3)

Selected topics in the history of technology.

26:510:521. TOPICS IN SOUTH ASIAN HISTORY (3)

Introduction to major themes in South Asian history and debates in the historiography of the Indian subcontinent from prehistoric times to the European colonial conquest.  These themes can include religious and nonwestern nationalism in South Asia, communalism, postcolonial thought, peasant movements, subaltern studies, and modernity.

26:510:525. COLLOQUIUM IN THE HISTORY OF WOMEN (3)

Readings and discussion on the history of women in the United States and Western Europe.

26:510:526. PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN AFRO-AMERICAN HISTORY (3)

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in the history of Afro-Americans in the U.S.

26:510:527,528. SELECTED TOPICS IN EUROPEAN POLITICAL AND DIPLOMATIC HISTORY (3,3)

Examination of issues and methods in European political and diplomatic history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.

26:510:529,530. SELECTED TOPICS IN EUROPEAN INTELLECTUAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY (3,3)

Examination of issues and methods in European intellectual and cultural history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.

26:510:531,532. PROBLEMS AND DIRECTED READINGS IN AMERICAN DIPLOMATIC HISTORY (3,3)

Examination of issues and methods in American diplomatic history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.

26:510:533,534. SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC HISTORY (3,3)

Examination of issues and methods in American social and economic history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.United States and Empire is the 2017 fall topic.

26:510:537,538. PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN THE ANCIENT WORLD (3,3)
Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature of the ancient world.

26:510:539. PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN MEDIEVAL HISTORY (3)

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in medieval European history.

26:510: 540. MODERN RUSSIA (3)

Major themes of post-Petrine Imperial Russia and the Soviet Union.

26:510:541. PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY 1350-1650 (3)

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in European history from 1350 to 1650.

26:510:542. THE HISTORY OF HEALTH AND INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT (3)

Examines the history of western efforts to promote health and nutrition in the developing world from the beginnings of tropical medicine. Traces the history through colonial health services to the development of the Global Programme on AIDS. Explores the various economic and political interests and underlying cultural assumptions that have shaped the development of ideas and practices associated with international health and development.

26:510:543. TOPICS IN WORLD HISTORY (3)

Selected topics in world history.

26:510:544. CARIBBEAN HISTORY (3)

Selected topics in Caribbean history.

26:510:545,546. PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN EUROPEAN HISTORY SINCE 1850 (3,3)

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in European history since 1850.

26:510:547. COMPARATIVE WORLD COLONIALISM (3)

Examines interactions of Europeans and non-Europeans after 1500. Emphasis on comparative analysis of the colonial experience in Asia, Africa, and Latin America.

26:510:548. ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF NORTH AMERICAN (3)

Explores the dialog between humankind and the environment in North America over the course of the last four centuries. Examines the latest and most interesting work done in the new field of environmental history to see what such a perspective has to offer.

26:510:549. MODERN LATIN AMERICAN HISTORY (3)

An introduction to the field of modern Latin American history.

26:510:551,552. SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN INTELLECTUAL AND CULTURAL HISTORY (3,3)

Examination of issues and methods in American intellectual and cultural history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.  For 2017 Fall the course is a Research Seminar in Radical Politics in the United States.

26:510:553,554. SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN POLITICAL AND LEGAL HISTORY (3,3)

Examination of issues and methods in American political and legal history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.

26:510:555,556. SELECTED TOPICS IN AMERICAN URBAN AND ETHNIC HISTORY (3,3)

Examination of issues and methods in American urban and ethnic history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.

26:510:557. WAR, TECHNOLOGY AND SOCIETY (3)

Examines key themes in the interrelationship between warfare, technology, and society from the beginnings of modern warfare until World War I. Primary emphasis placed on the historical connections between violent conflict, the technical means by which it is carried out, and the sociopolitical environment within which war takes place. Topics include the effect of technology on war and the effect of war on technological change and development.

26:510: 558. SELECTED TOPICS IN EUROPEAN SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC HISTORY (3)

Examination of issues and methods in European social and economic history, with a consideration of some leading problems in the field.

26:510:559. CITIES IN CHANGE I (3)

The process of urbanization as seen in the growth of historic European and North American cities and in the underdeveloped world: the revival of towns in the Middle Ages, the royal capital as center of power, rise of an urban way of life, nineteenth-century industrial cities, changing city forms and functions of the twentieth century, urban values in politics, business, and material culture.

26:510:560. CITIES IN CHANGE II (3)

The process of urbanization as seen in the growth, decline, and revival efforts of Newark, NJ. Examination of the economic, political, geographical, and social factors that helped develop Newark as New Jersey’s most important city and as one of the most troubled urban communities in the U.S. Attention to the origins of Newark’ decline; its relationship with suburban communities in northern New Jersey; the settlement of European immigrants and rural Afro-Americans in the late nineteenth and twentieth centuries; and recent efforts to revive the city’s political, economic, and cultural life.

26:510:561. PROBLEMS IN US FOREIGN POLICY (3)

Major historiographical problems and recent literature in US foreign policy.

26:510:562. THE URBAN ENVIRONMENT (3)

Examines the role of the economy, culture, and technology in shaping the urban environment. Makes extensive use of Newark and the New York metropolitan area, including field observations and local research. In addition to other topics, explores in detail spatial relationships, the role of transportation, and the development of suburbia.

26:510:563. TOPICS IN THE HISTORY OF HEALTH (3)

Selected topics in the history of health.

26:510:565. PUBLIC HISTORY (3)

Introduction to the principles and practices of public history. For 2017 Fall Place, Community and  Public Humanities.

26:510:566. WRITING AMERICAN HISTORY (3)

Exploration of the ways in which American history has been written and the issues that historians of America face when writing about its history.

26:510:567. GLOBAL ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY (3)

This course takes a global view of human interactions with the natural world, mixing broad themes such as colonialism and industrialization with detailed case studies in an effort to understand the complicated ways that people and the environment have mutually shaped one another in different places and at different times. Because environmental change often transcends national boundaries, this course places important subjects in environmental history such as disease, agriculture, pollution, and environmentalism into a global context.

26:510: 568. TOPICS IN ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY (3)

Selected topics in environmental history.

26:510:569. AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY TO 1860 (3)

Readings and discussion on the legacy of common law after the Revolution; the emergence of legal instrumentalism; and the evolution of tort, contract, and damages in the context of industrialism and economic growth.

26:510:570. TOPICS IN AMERICAN LEGAL HISTORY (3)

Readings and discussion on the growth of legal formalism, the evolution of substantive due process, changes in legal education and the legal profession, and the evolution of private law.

26:510:571. INTRODUCTION TO HISTORICAL METHOD (3)

Examines major theoretical approaches that have been used by historians and some of the works that have employed those approaches.

26:510:572. PHILOSOPHY OF HISTORY (3)

General survey of major trends in historiography and of leading issues in the philosophy of history.

26:510:573,574. PROBLEMS IN CENTRAL EUROPEAN HISTORY (3,3)

Topics in the nineteenth- and twentieth-century political, social, and intellectual history of Germany. The Hapsburg monarchy and its successor states.

26:510:576. PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1492-1789 (3)

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history from 1492 to 1789.

26:510:577. PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1789-1865 (3)

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history from 1789 to 1865.

26:510:581. PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1865-1914 (3)

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history from 1865 to 1914.

26:510:583. PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1890-1945 (3)

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history from 1912 to 1945.

26:510:585. PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN AMERICAN HISTORY, 1945 TO PRESENT (3)

Introduction to the major historiographical problems and recent literature in American history since 1945.

26:510:589,590. PROBLEMS AND READINGS IN AFRICAN HISTORY (3,3)

Various problems in African history, from the ancient African civilizations to the present day. Topics vary from year to year; contact the instructor for current topics.

26:510:591. CITY AND DISEASE IN HISTORY (3)

Explores the dynamic interaction between the growth of cities and changes in the experience and location of disease. Presumes the intertwining of these two historical developments in the birth of a distinctly urban identity, one predicated on the notion that the modern city is somehow inherently diseased. Focuses on the New York and Newark metropolitan areas in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Among the topics considered are epidemic outbreaks, quarantines, the technology and organization of sanitation and hygiene, the professional formation of public, industrial and occupational medicine, and medical and popular responses to immigration.

26:510:592. AFRICAN INTELLECTUAL HISTORY (3)

Selected topics in African intellectual history.

26:510:593. CULTURE AND SCIENCE IN THE HISTORY OF AMERICAN MEDICINE (3)

Provides an overview of American medical history and a familiarity with the theoretical and practical ramifications of different approaches to the complex relationships between medicine, science, and culture. Topics include: the extent to which medicine is or has been scientific; reasons why science has been considered so important to medicine’s professional culture; and the degree to which medicine’s professional culture has been shaped by science as well as other factors, such as economic and political self-interest, technology, class, race, gender, and other kinds of cultural values.

26:510:594. TECHNOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT AND MEDICINE IN WORLD HISTORY, 1500-1900 (3)

Examines the interrelationship between the emerging modern world system and changes in technology, environment, and medicine, with particular emphasis on European overseas expansion and its impact in non-Western regions.

26:510:595. SOCIAL HISTORY OF AMERICAN MEDICINE SINCE 1800 (3)

Topics include the practices of 19th-century regular medicine; the relation between medical concepts and mainstream social thought; the treatment of women’s health; antebellum alternative healers and alternative politics; the triumphs of late 19th- and early 20th-century medical therapeutics; the emergence of medicine as big business; medicine and racism; the emergence of nursing as a profession; modern medicine in an international perspective; New Age healing; the AIDS crisis and AIDS activism; and contemporary debates on the future of health care in the United States.

26:510:596. HISTORY OF THE BODY IN MODERN WESTERN CULTURE (3)

Considers medical or scientific history primarily in terms of implications for bodily experience in everyday life. Begins with grand narratives of historical shifts in bodily perceptions and practices, and proceeds to more focused narratives of changing bodily experience, engaging key distinctions between genders, classes, and species as well as perceptions of pain and internal bodily structure. Materials will be drawn from early modern and modern Europe, as well as more recent bodily experience in the United States.

26:510:597. TECHNOLOGY, CULTURE AND HISTORY (3)

Treats the relationship between technology and cultural values in a variety of historical and geographical settings, from early modern Japan to twentieth-century America. Examines the ways in which cultural ideals, conceptions, and preconceptions serve to influence the rate and manner of technological change, as well as the ways in which technology affects social and cultural life.

26:510:598. HISTORY OF TECHNOLOGY, ENVIRONMENT AND MEDICINE: THEORY AND METHOD (3)

A team-taught course which surveys the methods employed in the three fields. Explores the interdisciplinary nature of each field, and the value of interdisciplinary scholarship.

26:510:599. SOCIAL HISTORY OF COMMUNICATION (3)

Treats selected themes in the history of communication in different social and cultural contexts, from the ancient world to the twentieth century. Topics include: orality, proto-literacy, and literacy in ancient and medieval cultures; printing and the development of print culture in the early modern world; the communication revolution of the late 19th and early 20th centuries; and historiographical debates over the role of communication technologies in society.

26:510:618. SEMINAR: TEACHING OF HISTORY (3)

Experience in the planning of a course, leading discussions, and lecturing under the supervision of the student’s major professor. Critiques made by both the professor and the seminar participants.

26:510:619. INTERNSHIP IN PUBLIC HISTORY (3)

Professional training in various aspects of public history through on-site internships at local historical and cultural institutions, such as the New Jersey Historical Society and the Newark Museum. Students acquire skills in one or more of four areas: manuscripts curatorship, exhibitions and research, collections cataloging, and education and the public.

26:510:694.  Master's Essay (3) 

The Master's Essay is a substantial piece of written work, the capstone of the M.A./M.A.T program for those students who elect not to write a 6-credit master's thesis.  The essay is undertaken in consultation with an advisor.

26:510:695. INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN HISTORY (3)

Prerequisite: Permission of the director of graduate programs.  Offered both terms.

26:510:696. ADVANCED INDIVIDUAL STUDIES IN HISTORY (3)

Prerequisite: Permission of the director of graduate programs. Offered both terms.

26:510:697,698. RESEARCH IN HISTORY (3,3)

Normally reserved for M.A. thesis credit.

26:510:800. MATRICULATION CONTINUED (3)

Students must register for this every semester (except summer) if not registered for any other course in other to remain in appropriate status.